Thursday, September 14, 2017

Banned Book Week Giveaway Hop



I have always been fascinated by banned and challenged books. The minute someone challenges a book I want to read it. Some of the most profound, moving books are on the banned and challenged list. I wonder what it would have been like to never be able to read these books. I am so happy
to be apart if this hop. I am offering one book in this giveaway that has been banned or challenged.  Giveaway can be found at the bottom of the page.





Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.
(http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks)

Top Ten for 2016

Out of 323 challenges recorded by the Office for Intellectual Freedom

  1. This One Summer written by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Jillian Tamaki
    Reasons: challenged because it includes LGBT characters, drug use and profanity, and it was considered sexually explicit with mature themes
  2. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier
    Reasons: challenged because it includes LGBT characters, was deemed sexually explicit, and was considered to have an offensive political viewpoint
  3. George written by Alex Gino
    Reasons: challenged because it includes a transgender child, and the “sexuality was not appropriate at elementary levels”
  4. I Am Jazz written by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings, and illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas
    Reasons: challenged because it portrays a transgender child and because of language, sex education, and offensive viewpoints
  5. Two Boys Kissing written by David Levithan
    Reasons: challenged because its cover has an image of two boys kissing, and it was considered to include sexually explicit LGBT content
  6. Looking for Alaska written by John Green
    Reasons: challenged for a sexually explicit scene that may lead a student to “sexual experimentation”
  7. Big Hard Sex Criminals written by Matt Fraction and illustrated by Chip Zdarsky
    Reason: challenged because it was considered sexually explicit
  8. Make Something Up: Stories You Can’t Unread written by Chuck Palahniuk
    Reasons: challenged for profanity, sexual explicitness, and being “disgusting and all around offensive”
  9. Little Bill (series) written by Bill Cosby and and illustrated by Varnette P. Honeywood
    Reason: challenged because of criminal sexual allegations against the author
  10. Eleanor & Park written by Rainbow Rowell
    Reason: challenged for offensive language
(http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10#2016) 

More Information:
http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/
http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/

GIVEAWAY TIME!!!!
Up for grabs in one books from the following list of my most favorite banned or challanged book. The winner will choose one book from the following list and it will be shipped straight to them from amazon. 


Bruel, Nick.

Bad Kitty for President.

Square Fish.
Challenged in the Henderson, Nev., James Gibson Elementary School because when talking about money in a campaign, it says “A billion dollars! Holy %#@$.” The author of the chapter book said he believes the symbols are vague and harmless.

Source: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, Winter 2017, p.36.



Chbosky, Stephen.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

Pocket Books.
Removed from the Pasco, Fla., Middle School because it was deemed “disgusting” for its explicit sexual references. A substitute teacher at Pasco Middle School had assigned the novel to seventh-graders in an advanced language arts class. The novel was adapted into a film in 2012, which received mainly positive reviews; MTVUs Weekly, and Complex named it as one of the best films of the year. Challenged, but retained in the Dubuque, Iowa, School District after three hours of testimony at a school board meeting. While some parents complained about the book’s sex scenes and depictions of drugs and alcohol use, the overwhelming majority of those who spoke over the course of three hours defended the book. Many of the more than forty speakers talked about their personal connection to the book. The school will provide an alternative book if Advanced Placement students or their parents request it.
Source: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, Summer/Fall 2016, p. 36; Winter 2017, p. 72.

Hinton, S. E.

The Outsiders.

Dell; Viking.
Retained on the Williamsburg, Iowa, seventh-grade reading list. The book focuses on the life of a fourteen-year-old boy who struggles with concepts of wrong and right in a society in which he feels he is an outsider. The complainant said the book contained subjects that are socially, emotionally, and developmentally difficult for seventh-graders to deal with, including conflict, crime, death of a character, and gang fighting. The following reasons were cited for retaining the book in the seventh-grade curriculum: lower reading level allows the focus to be placed on the understanding and recognition of the themes that are developed in the book; favored by boys, who tend to be more averse to reading in general; and student members of the reconsideration committee both felt that the book was something they enjoyed reading and that it dealt with topics that come up in movies, television, and video games, and a classroom discussion about those things is helpful.
Source: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, Winter 2017, p. 72.

Sebold, Alice.

The Lovely Bones.

Little, Brown and Company.
Challenged and under review in the sophomore-level Academic English II classes at Lemont, Ill., High School District 210 because a parent considers it “pornographic.” The 2009 film received numerous accolades, including Golden GlobeScreen Actors Guild, British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA), and Academy Award nominations.
Source: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, Winter 2017, pp. 35–36.



Card, Orson Scott

Ender’s Game

Tor Science Fiction
A teacher at Schofield Middle School in Aiken, S.C. (2012) will not face criminal charges for reading to his students from the science-fiction book. In addition to the Card novel -- which has won several science-fiction awards and is listed on numerous children’s literature review websites as appropriate for readers twelve and older -- the teacher read excerpts from an Agatha Christie novel and a young adult novel set in the Old West, officials said. The incident came to light after the materials were characterized by one student and one parent as pornographic, according to a press release issued by the school district. 

       Source: Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom, May 2012, p. 107.

Ignatow, Amy

The Popularity Papers

Amulet
Challenged, but retained at two Prosser, Wash. elementary school libraries (2013). Only available to fifth graders, the book is about two girls who want to unlock the secrets to being popular in middle school. One of the girls has two fathers; the other has only a mother.
Source: Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom, May 2013, p. 124.


Pelzer, Dave

A Child Called It

HCI
Challenged at the Housel Middle School in Prosser, Wash. (2013) because the autobiography provides graphic depiction of child abuse. Middle-school students had to have parental permission to check out the book.
Source: Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom, Mar. 2013, p. 49.





Gaiman, Neil

Neverwhere

BBC Books
Temporarily removed from the Alamogordo, N.Mex. High School library and curriculum (2013) because of what one parent calls “inappropriate content.” The British author wrote in The Guardian: “Well-meaning adults can easily destroy a child’s love of reading. Stop them reading what they enjoy or give them worthy-but-dull books that you like—the twenty-first-century equivalents of Victorian ’improving’ literature—you’ll wind up with a generation convinced that reading is uncool and, worse, unpleasant.”
       Source: Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom, Nov. 2013, pp. 217-18.

Capote, Truman

In Cold Blood: A True Account of a Multiple Murder and its Consequences

Modern Library; Random; Vintage; G.K. Hall; Transaction
Some Glendale, Calif. Unified School District officials and parents (2011) attempted to block a request by a high school English teacher to add the text to the district’s advanced English curriculum because the nonfiction book was “too violent for a young audience”; the school board voted 4-0 to approve the book for Advanced Placement students. Since its publication in 1965, it has been widely recognized as a seminal work in American literature, frequently appearing on high school and college reading lists.

Source: Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom, Nov. 2011, p. 204; Jan. 2012, pp. 35-36.

Smith, Jeff

Bone

Scholastic
Retained in the Rosemount, Minn. elementary school libraries (2010) despite a parent’s concern that the series includes smoking, drinking, and gambling in its graphics and storyline. The series is rated suitable for fourth grade and up, has won several awards, and received positive reviews from national publications, including Time, which touted the series as the “best all-ages graphic novel ever published.”
Source: Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom, July 2010, p. 175.

Rafflecopter Giveaway 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Terms and Conditions: US Only. Book could be new or used but will come from Amazon. I will email the winner and they have 48 hours to respond or I will choose a new winner. Thanks for entering and good luck. 

This is a Blog Hop Continue the hop and check out these other blogs that are involved in the banned book blog hop. 


THANKS BOOKHOUNDS FOR HOSTING!!!!


Saturday, August 13, 2016

L. Andrew Cooper Featured Book Releases: Peritoneum & Leaping at Thorns Blog Tour and Giveaway



About the author:    L. Andrew Cooper scribbles horror: novels Burning the Middle Ground and Descending Lines as well as anthologies of experimental shorts Leaping at Thorns (2014 /2016) and Peritoneum (2016). He also co-edited the anthology Imagination Reimagined (2014). His book Dario Argento (2012) examines the maestro’s movies from the 70s to the present. Cooper’s other works on horror include his non-fiction study Gothic Realities (2010), a co-edited textbook, Monsters (2012), and recent essays that discuss 2012’s Cabin in the Woods (2014) and 2010’s A Serbian Film (2015). His B.A. is from Harvard, Ph.D. from Princeton. Louisville locals might recognize him from his year-long stint as WDRB-TV’s “movie guy.” Find him at amazon.com/author/landrewcooper, facebook.com/landrewcooper, and landrewcooper.com.  

Author Links:


Twitter:  @Landrew42








Book Synopsis for Leaping at Thorns: Leaping at Thorns arranges eighteen of L. Andrew Cooper’s experimental short horror stories into a triptych of themes–complicity, entrapment, and conspiracy–elements that run throughout the collection. The stories span from the emotionally-centered to the unthinkably horrific; from psychosexual grossness to absurd violence; from dark extremes to brain-and-tongue twister. These standalone stories add important details to the fictional world and grand scheme of Dr. Allen Fincher, who also lurks in the background of Cooper’s novels Burning the Middle Ground and Descending Lines.
Book Synopsis for Peritoneum:  Snaking through history–from the early-1900s cannibal axe-murderer of “Blood and Feathers,” to the monster hunting on the 1943 Pacific front in “Year of the Wolf,” through the files of J. Edgar Hoover for an “Interview with ‘Oscar,'” and into “The Broom Closet Where Everything Dies” for a finale in the year 2050–Peritoneum winds up your guts to assault your brain. Hallucinatory experiences redefine nightmare in “Patrick’s Luck” and “The Eternal Recurrence of Suburban Abortion.” Strange visions of colors and insects spill through the basements of hospitals and houses, especially the basement that provides the title for “TR4B,” which causes visitors to suffer from “Door Poison.” Settings, characters, and details recur not only in these tales but throughout Peritoneum, connecting all its stories in oblique but organic ways. Freud, borrowing from Virgil, promised to unlock dreams not by bending higher powers but by moving infernal regions. Welcome to a vivisection. Come dream with the insides.


My Thoughts: I read and will be reviewing  Peritoneum.  I want to say that I love horror but to be honest good terrifying horror can sometimes be hard to find.  But in my opinion if you want good, no dare I saw great, horror, check out Cooper. He truly delivers. He writes the shocking, mind blowing chilling horror that I love and is what I look for in a horror writer/story. Cooper's approach to writing will leave you thinking, asking questions and wanting more. My mind was reeling at just how believable his stories were. I didn't have to sleep with the lights on but boy did I have crazy dreams. And there were some stories I had to take a break after and go watch a Disney movie. HAHA. All in all Cooper is a gem of the horror genre and I will be reading all that I can find by him.

 Fave Stories: "Year of the Wolf", "Lizard Chrome", "Jar of Evil", "The Broom Closet Where Everything Dies", “The Long Flight of Charlotte Radcliffe”, “The Road Thief”.

My Rating: 4.8 out of 5,  .2 deduction for my sleepless nights. LOL 



Giveaway:

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Amazon Links for Peritoneum
Print Version

Kindle Version

Barnes and Noble Link for Peritoneum


Amazon Links for Leaping at Thorns
Print Version

Kindle Version


 




Tour Schedule and Activities
8/8      MyLifeMyBooksMyEscape    Interview
8/8      SpecMusicMuse   Guest Post
8/8      Darkling Delights   Guest Post
8/8      Beauty in Ruins  Guest Post
8/9      Jordan Hirsch  Review
8/10    The Seventh Star   Interview
8/10    Vampires, Witches, Me Oh My  Top Ten List
8/11    EricJude.com   Guest Post
8/12    Reviews Coming at YA  Guest Post
8/13    I Smell Sheep   Top Ten List
8/13    Bee's Knees Reviews   Review
8/14    Sheila's Guests and Reviews  Guest Post



The book/eBook being reviewed was provided for an honest review, and that no compensation was provided. 

Saturday, February 27, 2016

Leap into Books Giveaway Hop

leap into books 2016


 I am so excited to be apart of another hop hosted by BookHounds. This year is a Leap Year so we get an extra day. So what will you do with this extra day? Will it be just a regular work day? Do you have a tradition you do every leap year? Do you know anyone with a leap year birthday? Let me know your plans. While I was trying to come up with what to give away this time I was thinking about some of the great books I have leaped  into just because they came from a TV series that I love.   I think sometimes books based on series are not given as much press as deserved. So for my giveaway I will let the winner pick one TV series from the list and I will send you a book from that series. 




Enter Below for a chance to win a random book from one of the series listed. You pick the series. I pick the book. US Only. Books will be sent straight from Amazon.


a Rafflecopter giveaway



Continue on the hop.....




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